The 13 Best Yoga Poses for Runners

May 7, 2013 at 5:59 pm | Posted in Bareskin Towel, Diet, Fitness, Motivation, Pictures | Leave a comment
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By: DailySpark Blogger

When I first started running, I thought for sure it would be a bad combination with yoga. Running is repetitive, it can be hard on the body, and it’s fast.

After my first few runs, I felt sore and tight, despite my thorough stretching session afterwards. I spent all that time practicing yoga to loosen my muscles; it seemed silly to then tighten them up with one little run.

A few runs and a bit of research later, I changed my mind. Running and yoga complement each other quite well, and I don’t need to end up sore and tight after my runs.

The breath control (pranayama) we practice in yoga actually helps me keep my breathing even when runs get tough, and it’s especially helpful after a hard run. Plus, there is a certain peace that accompanies running (and walking). That repetitive motion allows your mind to clear, and the path that lies before allows your eyes to focus on the horizon. Add some motivating music, and you’ve got quite the relaxing and stress-relieving workout!

My friend Bob (BOBBYD31) SparkMailed me recently to ask about yoga. He’s a runner and, like many of you, battles tight hips and hamstrings. He wanted to try yoga but wasn’t sure where to start. I gave him some suggestions for DVDs and books–and did one better. I’m a certified Ashtanga yoga teacher, so I decided to create a routine for him and other runners to help them stretch out after a run and keep his muscles healthy and loose.

Here are a baker’s dozen poses to help runners (and cyclists and walkers). Hold each pose for 5 breaths or longer if you’d like. You’ll need a mat and a yoga block (or a chair) for these poses.

Before you begin, remember these precautions:

  • Do not start a yoga routine or any other workout without clearance from your doctor.
  • These poses are not suitable for pregnant women.
  • Each pose should be done in a slow and controlled manner, without bouncing or forcing, which can cause your muscles to tighten, increasing your risk of injury. Stretch in a slow, steady motion to the point of “mild discomfort.” If you are stretching to the point of pain, you have stretched too far. Learn to “respect your edge”–never go beyond it.
  • This routine can be integrated into a post-run stretching routine. You can also do it any time of day. If you’re not doing the stretches immediately following a workout, I recommend a 10-minute cardio warmup before starting this routine. Warm muscles are easier to stretch.
  • These poses and the accompanying photos are modified for people with tight hips and hamstrings.
  • A breath is one full inhalation and one full exhalation through the nose. Hold each pose for five breaths, or longer if you’d like.

Butterfly/cobbler stretch (Baddha konasana):
Benefits:
Opens the groin and hips; stretches the inner thighs
Forward folding stretches the back
How to:

  • Sitting tall on your mat, bring the soles of your feet together.
  • Interlace your fingers and place them around the toes.
  • Sit tall, rolling the shoulders back, and gaze past the end of the nose.
  • Lean forward for a deeper stretch, stopping when you start to “feel” the stretch.
  • With every inhale, feel your spine growing longer (imagine the crown of your head reaching out in front of you to the wall); with every exhale, allow the body to sink lower (the chest is getting closer to the floor).
    TIP: Use blocks under your knees if your hips are particularly tight.

 

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